Super Mario Bros. 2

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Super Mario Bros. 2

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Super Mario Bros. 2, later released in Japan as Super Mario USA (スーパーマリオUSA?), is a 1988 platform game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1985 game Super Mario Bros. The game was also remade as part of the Super Mario All-Stars collection for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES), released on August 1, 1993, in North America and December 16, 1993, in Europe. It was rereleased on the Wii’s Virtual Console in Europe, Australia and New Zealand on May 25, 2007, and the U.S. on July 2, 2007.
Super Mario Bros. 2 initially started out as a demo for a vertically scrolling, two-player, cooperative-action game that was scrapped.[4] The reasons included the technical limitations of the NES hardware making it difficult to produce a polished game featuring a vertical orientation and multiplayer features conceived for the project. It was decided to add more Mario-like elements, such as horizontal levels (though many vertically oriented levels were retained in the final project). Since the game had gone through some development, Nintendo created the game Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic for the Family Computer Disk System during its agreement with the Fuji Television company. The game was changed in order to fit with the theme of the mascots of the company and their adventure.
After Nintendo of America had concluded that the Japanese version of Super Mario Bros. 2 was too difficult, Nintendo redeveloped Yume Kōjō: Doki Doki Panic into Super Mario Bros. 2 for the international market outside of Japan.[4] The game became a commercial success, and eventually the game became well received enough that it was also released in Japan as well.

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2 thoughts on “Super Mario Bros. 2

  1. 32 of 38 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Sweet Incense of Childhood!, October 4, 2007
    By 
    Mike London “MAC” (Oxford, UK) –

    = Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
    This review is from: Super Mario Bros. 2 (Video Game)

    [UPDATE: Exciting news for those who love this game! “Super Mario Bros. 2” has been vindicated at LONG LAST! Nintendo has officially revealed that “Super Mario Bros. 2” began life as a prototype sequel to the original “Super Mario Bros.”, even before “The Lost Levels”, and was the intended second game in the series from the start. Apparently Nintendo were having issues with the prototype (as they were trying to implement co-op game play, a series mechanic that would not see fruition until “New Super Mario Bros. Wii” from 2009, and developed “The Lost Levels” and published that on the Famicom Disk System in the mean time. Fuiji Television approached Nintendo to develop a product for their 1987 Dream Event, so Nintendo took the existing Mario 2 sequel and released it in conjunction with Fuiji’s promo event.

    (Also be sure to check out the Nintendo Power two part guide given away for free back in the late 1980s for NP subscribers Super Mario Brothers 2 Inside Out [Nintendo Power])

    However, the important part is that not only was “Super Mario Bros. 2” a Mario game right from the start, Miyamoto and his team began developing the game BEFORE “The Lost Levels” as the intended sequel to “Super Mario Bros.”! So for all you out there who say “Super Mario 2” isn’t even a real Mario game, you have been proven wrong. Not only that, Miyamoto himsmelf said in E3 2012 that, along with “Super Mario Bros.”, “Super Mario Bros. 2” is his favorite game in the entire Mario series. Can’t get much higher praise than that! Mike London 10-1-2012]

    When “Super Mario Brothers 2” was released in the US in 1988, the game became an instant hit with gamers. What makes SMB2 so strange is how utterly and drastically different the game really is from its predecessor, Super Mario Bros., which is one of the pivotal cornerstones of the gaming industry. The game is expertly crafted (little surprise in that regard given it is a Miyamoto title), and just a great platformer with Mario quality, if not exactly Mario gameplay, written all over it.
    .
    Like most Nintendo franchises that began in the 1980s, the second installment in the series was incredibly weird and very different from the original. Case in point. Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. “Super Mario Brothers 2”. Mega Man 2. (Okay, I’m kidding about Mega Man 2. Mega Man is the one series that DOES NOT CHANGE AT ALL. Capcom remade Mega Man five times, and then moved it to the X series and remade that a bunch more times).

    Instead of jumping on turtles and goombas, trying to reach high scores, timed levels, SUPER MARIO 2 had absolutely nothing to do with the original game. It’s like Mario is on a bad acid trip. There’s transgendered, sexually confused birds shooting eggs (Birdo), mice that throw bombs and sport sunglasses, a weird, occultic, socially inept brotherhood that wears masks and robes, demonic phantos guarding keys, and a giant lizard who styles himself as a king takes control of people’s dreams (Freddy Krueger anyone?). Given the previous game, “Super Mario 2” is easily the weirdest of the main Mario series, make no mistake. The gameplay from SMB2, other than platforming, has absolutely nothing in common with the original SMB. You throw enemies at one another, throw vegetables, fight weird enemies, blow up walls with bombs, etc.

    Although the Americans didn’t know it at the time, Nintendo wasn’t really releasing SMB2. By now this game’s origins in well known, but back in the 1980s most gamers would have been shocked to realise that Nintendo took a preexisting game called DOKI DOKI PANIC, replaced the vaguely Arabian characters (one who was visibly pregnant) with Mario sprites, changed a few other sprites, rework the ending some, but otherwise leaving the game mechanics and the levels alone.

    Nintendo had already released a SUPER MARIO BROTHERS 2 in Japan, but that game was much like the second quest of Zelda, a much harder version of what is ultimately the same game. When it came…

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  2. 13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    my favorite Mario on the NES, May 2, 2003
    By 
    Joe Sherry (Minnesota) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Super Mario Bros. 2 (Video Game)

    While many consider this the black sheep of the Super Mario Bros series on the NES, this game is actually my favorite on the bunch. The world is nothing like the world of the other Mario games, and the enemies and bosses and goal is different. This is a quest to defeat Boss Wart (instead of Bowser) and you have the options of playing as one of four characters (with the ability to switch every level): Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, Toad. Each of these characters have different play characteristics. Toad can pick up any object with no difficulty but is the worst jumper. Princess is the opposite (no strength, but can float). Luigi has the best jump (no float), but that becomes its own problem. Mario is perfectly average. These strengths and weaknesses come into play in choosing who to use for each level and some are clearly better than others on any given level. Even though I found this game to be the easiest of the bunch, for me it was also the most fun. This is still a side-scrolling game, but some levels scroll up and down on the screen (keeping the side-scrolling viewpoint, though) depending on if you are climbing or dropping down. There are shortcuts in many levels and different ways to warp, get extra lives (including an odd cheat for extra lives), or to shorten the game. In the end, there are a couple of difficult levels, but this may be the easiest of the three on the NES. Even so, this is my favorite of all of the Super Mario games on the NES.

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